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Book Review: Joan Hess' "Death By the Light of the Moon"

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REVIEW BY HELEN KRUMMENACKER
Death by the Light of the Moon by Joan Hess was something I picked up from a Friends of the Library sale, a paperback mystery marking itself as A Claire Malloy Mystery. I’d never heard of the series, but the description was interesting. An eccentric, rich elderly lady dies the evening of a party that was meant to reveal her heirs. The protagonist is there by virtue of being a daughter-in-law, and barely knows the family.

The basic plot is grounded in the “cozy” style of mystery-- the murder takes place in a somewhat remote area, limiting the suspects mostly to the family, with a few hints about something more being afoot. The protagonist is not a professional detective, just someone with a knack for coming across trouble and ask questions. As the story goes on, it becomes a bit less cozy in both the genre and descriptive sense, as more bodies turn up and the protagonist becomes a target, giving a bit more of a thriller vibe at times. I found this to be no…

Book Review: Margaret Atwood's "The Handmaid's Tale"

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REVIEW BY HELEN KRUMMENACKER I’m starting this book review with the book still unfinished. It’s the kind of book that you think about a lot while reading it, even as you itch to turn the pages again. I can’t compare it to the movie or TV show, as I wanted to read it rather than watch it. I would advise this, although the adaptations may be excellent. The voice of the narrator is crucial.
The voice of the narrator is crucial to the story’s style. We begin, a little scared, a little confused, picking up meaning from tiny details-- because that is what she can give us. Her voice becomes clearer, gradually, as she moves farther from the drugging and brainwashing and has time to rebuild her story and factor in the new things. But even ¾ of the way through, I still don’t know what goes on in the colonies that has her worried about being sent there, or what the real fate of Unwomen is. Sometimes, it sounds like she’s afraid of being executed and sometimes it sounds like there is something w…

An Interview With Author Linda Bradley

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Linda’s inspiration comes from her favorite authors and life itself. Her women’s fiction highlights characters that peel away outer layers of life to discover the heart of their dreams with some unexpected twists and turns along the way. Her writing integrates humor found in everyday situations, as well as touching moments that make readers connect with her characters.
     Lindahas an Associates Degree in Interior Design and a Master’s Degree in Reading and Language Arts with undergraduate work in Elementary Education and Fine Arts. Linda has two grown sons and lives with her husband and rescue dog in Michigan. You can follow her at her WebsiteFacebook, andTwitter
When did you write your first book?
     I wrote and illustrated my first book in grade school. My elementary school had this contest called “Calbery”. The term “Calbery” was derived from the names of the Caldecott and Newberry Awards. Students wrote and illustrated their books each year. The winners received awards a…

Guest Post: Sheryl R. Hayes Author of "Chaos Wolf"

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Today we have the pleasure of welcoming Author Sheryl R. Hayes as our guest blogger who shares her insights about writing and tells us about her exciting debut book "Chaos Wolf".  Take it away Sheryl...  
Stringing Words Together To Create A Yarn    Aside from using tools that are stick-shaped, you wouldn’t think that there’s much similarity between writing and knitting. Believe it or not, there are a lot of parallels.       I have been a knitter and crocheter for about ten years, and creating costumes for the last six. I have been writing in some form or another for over twenty years, but started my novel about six years ago. My processes for writing a book and creating a costume are strikingly similar.     I start by deciding on what I am going to make. Be it a Cruella De Vil or an urban fantasy novel about werewolves and vampires, I need that seed idea to nurture.


    Next I figure out how I am going to do this. I study other costumes similar to what I want to do. I choose …

The Para-Earth Books

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"THE BRIDGE" - Book 1

Alex Hill buried his psychic talents for eighteen years. But with the scream of tires and twisting metal all this changes...      His girlfriend, Police Sergeant Veronica Ross, is nearly run down by two teenagers who wind up crashing their car and are pronounced dead at the scene. After calming his love down they get a call from the Coroner's office stating that both the driver and passenger of the wreck had NOT died at the scene, but had been dead for almost twelve hours as a result of drowning.
     Upon hearing this he feels his powers stirring again and insists on accompanying Veronica to the coroner Morgue to learn more. Upon their arrival Alex finds himself psychically assaulted by an unknown force. Taking the attack as a warning, he tries to resist getting involved further. But, his talents soon lead him directly to a stream underneath an old stone bridge which turns out to be where the teens had died. Unfortunately for him, both the bridge …

Guest Post: Review of Dan Brown's "Angels and Demons"

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Today I'm turning the reins over to guest blogger Tanmay Jain, who has just finished reading another one of Dan Brown's famous Robert Langdon novels.    Take it away, Tanmay...
Angels and Demons – Dan Brown Book Review

About the Author:
     Dan Brown is an American author of thriller novels, most notably the Robert Langdon stories: Angels & Demon, The Da Vinci Code, The Lost Symbol, Inferno and Origin. His other books include Deception Point and Digital Fortress. He is mostly known for the book The Da Vinci Code. Three of his books, Angels and Demons, The Da Vinci Code, and Inferno have been made into successful films.
Plot Introduction:
     The story starts with Robert Langdon, a Harvard professor and art historian being called down to Switzerland by CERN Director, Maximilian Kohler, when one of his most brilliant scientists, Leonardo Vetra, has been murdered with an ambigram seared into his chest, 'Illuminati'. Robert Langdon, being a specialist in the satani…

Book Review: Terry Pratchett's "Raising Steam"

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*****5 BIG Smiley Stars*****

Mr. Pratchett's latest offering to us is a wonderful read, in my opinion. I've seen other reviews where people lamented that his declining health was clearly showing in this book saying things like "it wasn't as funny..." or "...it felt like this was his farewell to the fans..." etc. A lot of this is understandable considering the rare form of alzheimer's he is fighting. But for me, this book felt more like a wonderfully wild ride that took us to various parts of the Discworld, just as the invention of the first train in Ankh-Morpork intended.
Pratchett uses the invention of the first steam engine to take us all over and reintroduce us to a number of old and familiar faces and places. We go back to Uberwald to visit Lady Margolotta, The Low King of the Dwarves, Bonk, the goblins, Harry King "King of the Golden River" (a river you would not want to swim in by the way folks), Commander Vimes and the Watch, Death,…